J-Term: Team Engagement Developers

“Personalized virtual communities for teaching and research are primed to be one of the next big things for librarians and academia. It’s part of the transition we face from content providers to engagement developers.” -Brian Matthews

I thought about this post in the Chronicle excerpted above when I was organizing content for the J-Term course I co-taught this month with the awesome Shaun Trujillo.

Our course, Media Archaeology, Digital Humanities & The Archives, experimented with a humanities lab, a concept/practice I’ve long wanted to explore. As a libarchivist/instructional technologist, I work towards meaningful integration of technology into teaching contexts. Digital projects require skills and relationships not often available in traditional humanities seminars. This is not to say that the content embedded in digital projects isn’t essential; Shaun and I are not swept up by ‘pixel dust;’ we committed to thinking about media and artifacts both conceptually and practically.

The Humanities Lab is not new. In the introduction to the recently published book, Comparative Textual Media: Transforming the Humanities in the Postprint Era, Hayles and Pressman talk about “a major development in integrating a media framework into humanities disciplines is the advent of the Humanities Lab. Among the early pioneers was Jeffrey Schnapp. When he was at Stanford University, he envisioned the Humanities Lab as providing space for collaborative work on large project that he calls the ”Big Humanities“ (by analogy with ”Big Science“)…Humanities Labs also lead the way in offering new models of pedagogy.” (xvi)

There are many rewards and opportunities for these types of classroom experiences, extending the tradition lecture and seminar into hands-on-digital projects. Hayles and Pressman offer a wonderful example from Duke University art history course. In our case, we did hands on work appraising digital photos, took apart an iMac, used software from 2001, and ran programs on a C–64.

C-64 Fun

As librarians, working with digital forensics and new media, our role as content providers is given, but our role as engagement developers is an emerging one. In order for complex assignments and experiences to be scaled undergraduate classrooms, faculty, librarians, and technologists need to team up to make these projects sustainable realities. Librarians are primed to collaborate meaningfully in these teams not just as “content providers but as engagement developers.” I am excited to continue collaborating with Shaun as we refine and extend our work together on media archaeology and digital forensics in the future.

Dream Team Reunited (@caropinto & @_datalore_ 4-eva)

Now that the holidays are over, I am excited to turn my attention to the January Term class I am co- teaching with Shaun Trujillo. Shaun is the Digital Collections & Metadata Lead in the Digital Assets & Preservation Department at Mount Holyoke College. Last spring, when I co-taught the Introduction to Digital Humanities Class at Hampshire College with Jim Wald, Shaun joined us for an exciting guest lecture. We had so much fun collaborating that we decided to teach together again this winter.

We collaboratively developed the syllabus over the last few months. We met in person to discuss our vision for the course, draft learning objectives, and brainstorm lab possibilities. We exchanged a number of links over email and Twitter, too. After many Twitter exchanges, we decided that we should make a hashtag (#mhcmediaarc) to better facilitate current issues and readings with our students in real time.

So, readers, if you see can’t-miss articles about media archeology, digital humanities, women in technology, neat coding how-tos, Git resources, other media studies materials, please feel free to share them with us using our hashtag: #mhcmediaarc

And, if you have any 5.5 floppy disks, we’d love to have them.

More to come: class starts Tuesday 7 January in the Media Lab at Mount Holyoke College.

Box of Floppy Disks

At Long Last, Reflections on Becoming MoHome

Archives & Special Collections, Mount Holyoke College

Archives & Special Collections, Mount Holyoke College

This semester is one of those semesters where I literally cannot believe how fast time is passing. The summer and the start of the semester were extremely busy, but for wonderful reasons. Our merged IT/Library (LITS) overhauled our orientation programming considerably to ‘radically welcome’ new students to Mount Holyoke. A significant part of orientation was also curricular; on the first Saturday of orientation my colleague Leslie Fields and I led the first session of the first year connections course (CUSP). Asked by the organizers to present a session about college history that brought the magic of the archives to about 500 entering students during six concurrent sessions. The question of scale immediately came to mind: how would we think about sharing the wonders of primary sources to so many students during 50 minute sessions?

We decided that the most expedient and perhaps AWESOMEST way of sharing some of Mount Holyoke College’s traditions and history with students was the create an online exhibit using materials from their great-grandmother class of 1917 to compare and contrast their experiences. Above all, we wanted to give the new students a sense that they are part of a larger community, the larger Mount Holyoke Community that thrives and endures beyond graduation and over generations. As the college song refrains, “Mount Holyoke forever shall be.”

So, how to build a site that would both communicate college history, make curricular connections, engage first year students AND look cool?

The four-legged stool of Archives & Special Collections (the goods), RIS (curricular connections), Archives & Special Collections Student Ambassadors (awesome engagement) and Digital Assets & Preservation (technical prowess & keen design sense) decided that we would build an Omeka site collaboratively. DH aficionados love talking about Omeka and there is no shortage of posts talking about its usability and extensibility, but what I wanted to share the link to our site and say some things about the process.

-Students Need Context: Over and over again when I work on digital projects with students, just saying, ‘go do this thing!’ never helps. Providing context, instruction, and measurable goals can help students realize their curation potential. I met fairly regularly with our main student to scaffold the process from idea, to research, to storyboarded exhibit towards a proof of concept before we even talked about Omeka itself.

-Better Together: Omeka’s extensibility really shines when you work with a variety of stakeholders. I alone in Research & Instructional Support could not have created this successful exhibit without the students’ insight/enthusiasm, special collections’ golden content, or Digital Assets & Preservation’s technical know-how & design moxie. With roles for curation, design, and technical support, we were able to do much more than slap some images onto a site. We created a narrative that leveraged plugins downloaded from GitHub and enjoyed a custom designed inspired from our own archival collections.

-Digital Project Outreach Matters: This site was an important step for our team not only in terms of delivering content for a particular class, but also get ourselves better acquainted with a tool that we hope to use more broadly in the curriculum. It’s so easy for successful projects and processes to get lost in the shuffle which is why Sheila Brennan’s post about Digital Project Outreach continues to ring true for me. She writes that “outreach is intentional, is integral to a tools/project’s success…is not only about publicity, the job includes testing and making the tool accessible to targeted audiences; is user advocacy.” We kept our users at the center of this project, not only in terms of the content, but the process, how can we make digital curation scalable to the undergraduate classroom? How can this project be used as model for future projects? We shared our success on social media and found that our community responded with sustained engagement with the site beyond the concurrent sessions during orientation. I also hope that students will also see themselves in the process of creation; that knowing other undergraduates were at the heart of curation will inspire them to ask bold questions and dive into digital scholarship.

You can visit our exhibit here.

My Middle Name Should be Calendar: YouCanBook.me

The semester is upon us!

My liaison team at Mount Holyoke had a semester ramp-up/psych up meeting a few weeks ago, in which we shared strategies for managing the start-of-term craziness. I demonstrated some of the curriculum and collection mapping I’ve been doing this summer in Coggle to learn about my new departments, and another colleague shared her favorite calendar management tool, YouCanBook.me. My struggles to manage email and calendar appointments is documented on this blog here. While I had some luck with lizibot last year, I also found that there were some bugs that gave me pause over the summer. As my colleague demoed YouCanBook.me, I realized it was time to make another switch for these reasons:

  1. It just works with Google Calendar without any muss or fuss.
  2. Customizable settings. It was easy to set my time zone and block off times for lunch and anticipate meeting heavy days that don’t make open hours optimal.
  3. Minimal steps for users to make an appointment. Lizibot had too many cumbersome steps.

The school year is always a time management battle; new projects occupy precious brain bandwidth; revision of my teaching materials is continual; meeting with as many students one-on-one is a perpetual goal; and back up on service points like the Research Help Desk can derail my best intentions to multitask. I am always looking for new ways to simply routine tasks like setting up meetings, responding to email, and managing my time. Resources like ProfHacker and Life Hacker inspire me to tweak my habits and workflows so I can spend my time wisely and not get lost in the roundabouts of administrivia. Here’s to a great semester!

Via The Library of Congress on Flickr Commons

Via The Library of Congress on Flickr Commons

Summer Learning: #dhpoco summer school

For some, summer might be about beach trips and milk shakes, but for me, summer is about learning (well, and a little about milkshakes and other delicious rituals). I love using the slower pace of college campuses during the summer to develop myself, make a work plan for the year, and learn something new. I am really excited to participate in [#dhpoco summer school, “an informal, month-long collaborative online course exploring issues related to Postcolonial Digital Humanities.”] (http://dhpoco.org/blog/2013/05/20/coming-soon-dhpoco-summer-school/) Let me break down why:

  1. Broadening Digital Humanities Practice/Theory One of the most important outcomes from teaching Intro to DH last semester at Hampshire was the realization that there are significant structural inequalities in DH in terms of who practices DH and what types of cultural heritages materials get digitized, case in point, this tweet from Barnard Libraries:

    In my new role at Mount Holyoke College, I continue to support both western and non-western disciplines and always want to find new points of engagement.

  2. Online Learning MOOCS, blended classrooms, flipped classrooms, digital learning. I spend plenty of time reading about these new classroom experiences and learning opportunities, but haven’t found the right opportunity to participate yet. This will be a good foray into the world of online learning and perhaps inspire me to enroll in a MOOC or, better yet, find new ways of engaging with online tools and spaces to do my own teaching.
  3. Learning for ME At the end of last term, I attended a dinner party with colleagues from Hampshire and one of my friends mentioned that she was going to be attending a short term course in North Carolina this summer, where she would be a student as opposed to the instructor. That definitely resonates with me; last term I spent a Friday afternoon in February in a seminar with other Digital Humanities interested folks as part of the a short-term Kahn Institute for Liberal Arts Project called “From Hypercities to Big Data and #Alt-Ac: Debates in the Digital Humanities” It was luxurious to talk through ideas in a seminar setting with other engaged people. I am excited to see what this type of engagement will look like online.

I voted for readings and look forward to seeing how the course will develop. I’ll be writing about it here.

I won an iPad mini

I never win prizes after taking surveys, but there is a first time for everything, right?

Towards the end of my time at Hampshire College, I took a survey about sexual harassment and entered a contest to win an iPad mini. To my surprise, I won!

I’ve documented my love of the iPad on the blog earlier this year, so I figured I would revisit an iPad review in light of the new addition to my gadget arsenal. Spoiler alert: I love it, but not without reservations.

Size: The third generation iPad is light and thin, but the iPad mini is miraculously light and thin. It’s a noticeable difference. I can hold the mini in one hand while reading in bed or on the couch. It’s a breeze to cart around during the day and I hardly noticed its weight in my bag shuffling between work and home. Typing on it is also a welcome change. No stranger to live-tweeting conferences on my iPhone (too small) or iPad (okay), the iPad mini is just right, as my live-tweeting of the Five College All-Staff Round-Up proved.

Performance: The mini is just as fast and responsive as its third generation cousin. Apps download quickly, webpages open quickly, and I am very pleased.

Display:  :( The retina display on the third generation iPad is awesome, and I definitely miss it on the mini. However, I keep myself reaching for the mini because the size is so perfect for my needs, which include writing, editing, email, note taking, web browsing, and heavy reading. As much as I love the mini, I still find myself saying, “CURSES, THERE ISN’T RETINA DISPLAY.”

Conclusion: Had I not won the mini, I would not have purchased one of my own. I have an iPad that I love already. and the lack of retina display makes me sad. However, if/when Apple releases an iPad mini with retina display, I would definitely buy one. The smaller tablet size is fantastic; I love the flat back of the mini, the light weight, and ease of use.

The iPad mini, shown here next to a book for scale.

Automate Me

If 2012 was my year of the iPad, then 2013 is my year of automation. I credit ProfHacker for many things in my development as a technologist, and I am going to add automation to the list.

I started my automation journey slowly. Last year, I began using an online calendar tool called Lizibot to cut down on the number of emails I passed back and forth with students about arranging appointments. It changed my life in a small but measurable way. I wrote fewer emails, students knew right away when they could meet with me, and now – for the class I co-teach – I have a link right to my calendar, so there’s no more messing around with weekly, mercurial schedules for me. Following my foray into Lizibot, I began experimenting with text expansion tools, specifically by downloading TextExpander for iOS. Again, It’s a pleasure to be able to write drafts of emails without having to type my phone number, email address, or standard closing salutations for email.

The next automation wave crested after reading a Profhacker post about IFFT. IFFT is essentially “if this, then that” moderated by a third party. It’s dead easy. The Profhacker post breaks it down well. Since that’s been published, many more time-saving “recipes” have been added to the voluminous library. I especially like the “if I change my profile photo on Facebook, then it changes on Twitter, too,” recipe. But the recipe with the most impact on my working life is the once which states: “if @en appears on my Google calendar appointment, then a meeting note template in Evernote is created.” Thanks to this blog post, I now have a powerful tool to take meeting minutes easily.

Automation might make me sound like a robot, but it allows me work smarter. The meeting notes template is a great example of that. I realized that having a template for taking meeting notes wouldn’t just make me more organized, it forced me to take more effective notes, making the task of acting as minute taker less tiresome. By having predetermined fields like ‘attendees’ to fill in immediately and ‘action items’ to fill in throughout the meeting, I could listen more actively and my notes ultimately would make more sense. And I added a section called ‘to do’ that allows me to remember complementary activities long after the meeting is done. Gone were the panic moments when I didn’t know what was talked about or remember action items I needed to add to a list. Awesome.

Here’s my take on Rubin’s original recipe that I referenced in the first paragraph.

Automation saves me time, but it also gives me something else: headspace. By automating parts of my working life, I have the headspace to think; I have a few extra minutes to daydream, an ability to carve out an outlet to think about my work in new ways. By having those few moments to take a step back and reflect, I can actually think about what’s next, what’s coming, where I want to go, where we need to go. Automation allows me to sit back like the West Wing‘s president Josiah Bartlett and ask: what’s next?

Faculty-Librarian Collaborations (& Friendship)

I met one of my most trusted professional collaborators and dear friends at an orchestra camp when I was 16 years old. I hated high school and was generally dour, a surprise to those who know me post-college. Trying to make sense of my identity in a community that was not accepting of difference didn’t give me much to smile or laugh about. Playing classical music was my outlet and I met wonderful, supportive friends through that venture. But no one made me laugh quite like Carla Martin did between rehearsals in the middle of Maine in 1998.

We lost touch when we went to college, but thanks to a Mark Zuckerberg production called Facebook, we reconnected when we were both working in Cambridge in 2008. We talked a lot about teaching and higher education since we were both in graduate school, me in library school, Carla in a ph.d program at Harvard. As our responsibilities shifted towards classroom work, we both noticed on Twitter that we were experimenting at the intersection of humanities, social science, and technology. We started talking more about what works in classrooms and what doesn’t, what types of tools are available and how to recast products in an academic context. Talking about our work in the context of the digital humanities community has only put the uniqueness of our relationship into focus.

Last week, we presented a flipped session about faculty-librarian collaboration at Digital Humanities: The Next Generation. As Lindsay Whitacre noted in her presentation on Saturday, “DH is not just a new set of tools and methods, it’s a new set of relationships.” I and many others have said before that Digital Humanities is a team sport, a collaborative venture that cannot be sustained by lone wolves or solitary geniuses. Digital Humanists must be as serious about building and sustaining relationships as they are about building tools.

Flipped Sessions are Fun.

Flipped sessions are fun.

My relationship with Carla is one of those important ones. I am a better librarian for knowing her, for listening to her talk about the logistics of scaling up digital projects to larger classes, for asking questions about how to support first generation students with skillfully crafted assignments and syllabi, and for helping me better understand how librarians can support junior faculty with their institutional knowledge. She’s forthcoming with examples of assignments that work, for thinking about new ways of marketing courses, and for hands-on activities in classes that I can talk about in my local community. We don’t work for the same institution, so our conversations are casual collaborations, but we can practice communication strategies we can bring home and use in our local contexts.

Our presentation dealt with miscommunications between librarians and faculty. It’s an elephant in the room when we talk about how to thoughtfully incorporate technology into classrooms. Some faculty may have an expectation that librarians and technologists passively will enact whatever they want. Other librarians may have a fear that faculty don’t value them professionally. Some faculty may feel like librarians can be passive aggressive with them when talking about workloads. Other faculty may feel like librarians can be dismissive of their technology skills. Bad communication patterns are also reinforced by higher education hierarchies that put faculty at the top and librarians towards the bottom. In my experience, librarians and faculty have excellent, complementary skills that when put in service of students, learning and research can be a powerful force for good. Librarians are masters of process; the research process, increasingly in many cases, how to manage technology projects or experimenting with technology in their practice. Faculty are masters of the content, experts in their field. I read a quote on the Feral Librarian’s blog this week from Deborah Jakubs:

“…librarians are learned and talented and bring skills and attitudes and services to the university that most regular faculty both admire and need. So rather than constantly trying to compare ourselves to faculty, and often coming up short, let’s celebrate the differences and complementarity.”

Why not leverage these complementary skill sets to build a relationship to enable digital humanities, whether it be in a research or classroom setting?

In addition to providing tangible benefits to our students and to our faculty, I think individual faculty and librarians themselves can benefit from working in teams and from participating in engaged professional relationships. Beyond doing my job better, my relationship with Carla and other faculty members enrich my life and work generally, especially since we still laugh as hard together as we did in 1998.

#5CDH: Walls, Shawls, iPads, Maps & DH

  1. @oleblanc follow #5cdh & @caropinto for live tweets from the “Of Roman Walls” DH Event at Amherst 3/1 ow.ly/hMUhf
  2. A panel featuring Karen Remmler (MHC), Jon Olson, (UM) & Caro Pinto (HC) kicked off the afternoon. 
  3. Olson is talking about ‘hacking the humanities.’ What are the humanities now? #5CDH
  4. The Europe in the 20th c. history site @jonberndtolsen and his students created digital.history.umass.edu/e… built with WordPress #5CDH
  5. Olson described how his humanities classes incorporated technology & the delicate balance between humanities & technology. Of course, this is not a question limited to just the humanities.
  6. Olson: How do we offer technology courses geared towards the humanities? This is an issue for science students too – multidisc problem #5CDH
  7. It is clear faculty cannot tackle content & technology on their own. What are the best practices?
  8. Olson musing on how to teach digital skills in the humanities. He suggests computer scientists embedded, I say, librarians. #5CDH
  9. Olson aslo mused about how mold our students into makers. Jeffrey Schapp from Harvard talks about cultivating a hybrid producer/consumer model called prosumers. 
  10. Olson: Our students are largely digital consumers & not necessarily digital producers. Glad I am trying to mold prosumers. #5CDH
  11. Caro Pinto talked about translating the value of successful and unsuccessful DH projects; how to build effective teams, and how to balance hierarchy and collaboration. 
  12. .@caropinto Librarians embedded in courses can really shape how to teach technology- how do we translate the value of what we’re doing #5CDH
  13. .@caropinto How do we translate the value of failure? Good question! So much value in something traditionally seen as ‘bad.’ #5CDH
  14.  Karen Remmler discussed feminism & DH. 
  15. Karen Remmler is now talking about the symposium she is putting together about feminism in the digital age. #5CDH
  16. Remmler: How do we decide what knowledge is valuable? #5CDH
  17. Remmler’s comments connect the the emergent #transformdh movement led by @adelinekoh & others.
  18. Karen Remmler brings up appropriateness of using the term DH, in LACs and generally. Reminds me of @pannapacker @adelinekoh & others #5CDH
  19. Remmler is talking about the digital divide, the knowledge divide. How those forces shape who is #dh. #transformdh #5CDH
  20. Remmler coming from a feminist perspective, emphasizes importance of theorizing DH & how we use it #HellYes #5CDH
  21. Remmler also talked about upcoming events & projects that explore these issues.
  22. Exciting media & digital-focused projects from the 5Colleges Women’s Studies Rsrch Ctr, which Remmler directs fivecolleges.edu/fcwsrc/pro… #5CDH
  23. The Q & A advanced a discussion of how to balance teaching content w/ teaching technology.
  24. .@caropinto Need to organize low-level classes to introduce students to tech, but higher-level courses have higher tech requirements. #5CDH
  25. And what types of assumptions we make about why our students reject e-books. 
  26. Q: How do we get students excited abt tech? Olson: This is not an eBook or an eArticle generation – students not digitally savvy #5CDH
  27. .@caropinto Barrier to using eBooks – not a format we librarians like to use – can’t pass on excitement if you’re not excited abt it. #5CDH
  28. We need to also think ab the materiality of the text, not just the content – hard copy may be important for some reading #5CDH
  29. What kinds of tools do we want to use? What kind of infrastructure do we want to build? 
  30. .@caropinto What kind of future do we want to build with technology? What do we want it to look like? #5CDH
  31. .@caropinto Educating students about economies behind digital technologies they use – what will happen to Twitter in 5 yrs? Copyright? #5CDH
  32. And then the group asked how do we preserve these projects? 
  33. .@caropinto – “we need to decide whether or not we’re keeping these projects” re: student digital work. A very real question #5CDH
  34. Then we broke for lunch. Attendees and panelists mingled as students gathered to talk about their work and experiences. 
  35. After a lunch break, we are back with a student panel. #5CDH
  36. The panel featured both graduate students & undergraduate students talking about their projects. 
  37. Students processing archival collecting while blogging. Lots of engagement from professionals around the world. #5CDH
  38. Learning abt Early Novels Database: Part digitization, part recording info. Gain access to great collx of text syslsl01.library.upenn.edu/… #5CDH
  39. Discussing the historicdress.org/omeka/ project, powered by Omeka. Different period but thought of you @nervesandveins #5CDH
  40. Looking at the Holyoke self-tour project from the Wistariahurst Museum, can be used on smartphones wistariahurst.org/walk-holy… #5CDH
  41. Students talking about the tools they used to collect data & manage research process w/ @zotero & @evernote #5CDH
  42. Students followed up on the skill building conversation that began during the panel sharing their experiences with short term certificate courses.
  43. Photoshop, Garage Band, Final Cut Pro, DreamWeaver, all skills included in an Intro to Digital Media class. Students get certificate. #5CDH
  44. Big assumption that current generation is tech literate. Not true – some learn on their own, but not a pervasive skill #5CDH
  45. Of course, this is a brave new world for students. DH includes experimentation, it brings trial & error to the humanities. 
  46. “There isn’t a template for doing any project” – necessary learning to experiment, trial & error valuable in and of itself #5CDH
  47. As well as boredom. 
  48. “A lot of the work we did was boring.” Student reflects on some of the work she contributed a #DH project. Not all #DH is sexy. #5CDH
  49. Student admits the “boring” “drudgery” of work behind sexy DH projects – how to balance this with LAC traditions of analysis? #5CDH
  50. Also, students should not be used to just absorb drudgery in #dh. But drudgery is part of building #dh. How to balance? #5CDH
  51. Project managers & faculty need to effectively communicate expectations and DH values to new participants to contextualize their labor. 
  52. There is a lot of delayed gratification in #dh. How to balance getting stuff done & vision. How to effectively communicate impact. #5CDH
  53. Student talks ab importance of prof helping them think through theoretical, academic implications of the “drudgery” work they did #5CDH
  54. Q: How do you deal with the drudgery? A: When you’re done, realize how important & worthwhile it was. Balancing b/t drudgery&fun helps #5CDH
  55. Socializing students into the #dh community as well as skill building. Ethics & community on social media.
    #5CDH
  56. But the proof is in the pudding:
  57. Student describes first uploads to Omeka as “amazing” – like “first discovering google search” #5CDH cc @patrick_mj :)
  58. Students are gratified to see their work online. Really gratified. #5CDH
  59. Important pedagogical implications RT @caropinto Students are gratified to see their work online. Really gratified. #5CDH
  60. Eric Poehler shares Pompeii Project that featured iPads, enthusiastic students & drones. 
  61. Investigating Pompeii without excavation. Digital Magic! #5CDH.
  62. Beautiful non-intrusive, digital archaeology of Pompeii from @Pompeiana79 – including cool drone camerawork #5CDH #MakeScholarshipNotWar
  63. great to watch @Pompeiana79 explain how to use iPad for #archaeology mapping when excavation too costly, intrusive #5CDH #DH #preservation
  64. Poehler’s effectively demonstrated how the technology enabled his team to do more analysis. 
  65. New tech allows archaeologists to spend less time measuring and matching, and more time to extend the interpretation of work. #5CDH
  66. Putting interpretation in the field – real value of efficiency #5CDH
  67. .@Pompeiana79: #digital technology allows us to record data in 1/10 time–which allows us 10x as much time for interpretation. #archaeology
  68. @Pompeiana79: #archaeology #mapping techniques e.g. terrestrial laser scanning, #drones (drink!), cloud-based photogrammetry, GPR #DH
  69. With wonderful offline implications:
  70. .@pompeiana79: once you learn to see time in material, you’ll never look at things the same way again #archaeology #preservation
  71. After Poehler’s talk, we closed out the day with posters & socializing. 
  72. Finishing up the day with a ‘moveable feast’ of poster sessions from current projects in Five Colleges. #5CDH