Dispatches from Re: Humanities 2014 (#rehum14)

I had the pleasure of traveling to Haverford College this past week to attend Re: Humanities: Play, Power, Production. Re: Humanities is a conference organized by undergraduates to showcase undergraduate work in the digital humanities. Their work speaks for itself; I created a storify that encapsulates the energy and spirit of the event. I am already looking ahead to Re: Humanities 2015. Congratulations, #nextgendh!

PS: Here’s a write-up from Technically: Philly.

A quick pic from my iPhone.

Haverford College via my iPhone.

J-Term: Team Engagement Developers

“Personalized virtual communities for teaching and research are primed to be one of the next big things for librarians and academia. It’s part of the transition we face from content providers to engagement developers.” -Brian Matthews

I thought about this post in the Chronicle excerpted above when I was organizing content for the J-Term course I co-taught this month with the awesome Shaun Trujillo.

Our course, Media Archaeology, Digital Humanities & The Archives, experimented with a humanities lab, a concept/practice I’ve long wanted to explore. As a libarchivist/instructional technologist, I work towards meaningful integration of technology into teaching contexts. Digital projects require skills and relationships not often available in traditional humanities seminars. This is not to say that the content embedded in digital projects isn’t essential; Shaun and I are not swept up by ‘pixel dust;’ we committed to thinking about media and artifacts both conceptually and practically.

The Humanities Lab is not new. In the introduction to the recently published book, Comparative Textual Media: Transforming the Humanities in the Postprint Era, Hayles and Pressman talk about “a major development in integrating a media framework into humanities disciplines is the advent of the Humanities Lab. Among the early pioneers was Jeffrey Schnapp. When he was at Stanford University, he envisioned the Humanities Lab as providing space for collaborative work on large project that he calls the ”Big Humanities“ (by analogy with ”Big Science“)…Humanities Labs also lead the way in offering new models of pedagogy.” (xvi)

There are many rewards and opportunities for these types of classroom experiences, extending the tradition lecture and seminar into hands-on-digital projects. Hayles and Pressman offer a wonderful example from Duke University art history course. In our case, we did hands on work appraising digital photos, took apart an iMac, used software from 2001, and ran programs on a C–64.

C-64 Fun

As librarians, working with digital forensics and new media, our role as content providers is given, but our role as engagement developers is an emerging one. In order for complex assignments and experiences to be scaled undergraduate classrooms, faculty, librarians, and technologists need to team up to make these projects sustainable realities. Librarians are primed to collaborate meaningfully in these teams not just as “content providers but as engagement developers.” I am excited to continue collaborating with Shaun as we refine and extend our work together on media archaeology and digital forensics in the future.

Dream Team Reunited (@caropinto & @_datalore_ 4-eva)

Now that the holidays are over, I am excited to turn my attention to the January Term class I am co- teaching with Shaun Trujillo. Shaun is the Digital Collections & Metadata Lead in the Digital Assets & Preservation Department at Mount Holyoke College. Last spring, when I co-taught the Introduction to Digital Humanities Class at Hampshire College with Jim Wald, Shaun joined us for an exciting guest lecture. We had so much fun collaborating that we decided to teach together again this winter.

We collaboratively developed the syllabus over the last few months. We met in person to discuss our vision for the course, draft learning objectives, and brainstorm lab possibilities. We exchanged a number of links over email and Twitter, too. After many Twitter exchanges, we decided that we should make a hashtag (#mhcmediaarc) to better facilitate current issues and readings with our students in real time.

So, readers, if you see can’t-miss articles about media archeology, digital humanities, women in technology, neat coding how-tos, Git resources, other media studies materials, please feel free to share them with us using our hashtag: #mhcmediaarc

And, if you have any 5.5 floppy disks, we’d love to have them.

More to come: class starts Tuesday 7 January in the Media Lab at Mount Holyoke College.

Box of Floppy Disks

Summer Learning: #dhpoco summer school

For some, summer might be about beach trips and milk shakes, but for me, summer is about learning (well, and a little about milkshakes and other delicious rituals). I love using the slower pace of college campuses during the summer to develop myself, make a work plan for the year, and learn something new. I am really excited to participate in [#dhpoco summer school, "an informal, month-long collaborative online course exploring issues related to Postcolonial Digital Humanities."] (http://dhpoco.org/blog/2013/05/20/coming-soon-dhpoco-summer-school/) Let me break down why:

  1. Broadening Digital Humanities Practice/Theory One of the most important outcomes from teaching Intro to DH last semester at Hampshire was the realization that there are significant structural inequalities in DH in terms of who practices DH and what types of cultural heritages materials get digitized, case in point, this tweet from Barnard Libraries:

    In my new role at Mount Holyoke College, I continue to support both western and non-western disciplines and always want to find new points of engagement.

  2. Online Learning MOOCS, blended classrooms, flipped classrooms, digital learning. I spend plenty of time reading about these new classroom experiences and learning opportunities, but haven’t found the right opportunity to participate yet. This will be a good foray into the world of online learning and perhaps inspire me to enroll in a MOOC or, better yet, find new ways of engaging with online tools and spaces to do my own teaching.
  3. Learning for ME At the end of last term, I attended a dinner party with colleagues from Hampshire and one of my friends mentioned that she was going to be attending a short term course in North Carolina this summer, where she would be a student as opposed to the instructor. That definitely resonates with me; last term I spent a Friday afternoon in February in a seminar with other Digital Humanities interested folks as part of the a short-term Kahn Institute for Liberal Arts Project called “From Hypercities to Big Data and #Alt-Ac: Debates in the Digital Humanities” It was luxurious to talk through ideas in a seminar setting with other engaged people. I am excited to see what this type of engagement will look like online.

I voted for readings and look forward to seeing how the course will develop. I’ll be writing about it here.

#5CDH13: Building a Community of Practice

Digital Humanities is a team sport. As libraries/information technology units develop programs and initiatives to promote and partner with faculty in digital humanities, it’s clear that our community hungers for best practices and inspiration to create and sustain a community of practice. What’s a group of librarians, technologists, and digital humanists to do?

In the Five Colleges, we will explore these issues in a day long event that will include a moderated panel and facilitated discussion that will will help our consortium build and sustain a community of practice around digital humanities. To that end, tomorrow we will welcome speakers from Colgate University, Haverford College, and Washington and Lee University to talk about their work in digital humanities in a moderated panel. During the afternoon, we will work small breakout groups to address the central question – what does it take to become an effective digital humanities community of practice?

The Five College Libraries Committee DEDCC (Digital Environment Development & Coordinating Committee) encourages participants to chronicle on social media using the hashtag: #5CDH13.

See you all tomorrow!

Reflections on THATCamp

THATCamp: ACRL

When I started working at Hampshire, I had a reasonable idea of what anthropology was as a discipline; however, I was not aware of how it could be practiced locally, a misconception I quickly corrected through my engagement with Nancy Foster Fried’s and Susan Gibbons’ work at the University of Rochester. The biggest take away for me is that trends about user behaviors can be both local and universal; students are checking out fewer books more generally, the reasons for which have local reasons and implications.

At Hampshire, I began experimenting with ethnographies in small ways to learn about my student population, to understand their context for learning and living and how I could frame my outreach efforts to match their needs. For instance, I learned that many students live off campus. Many of those students in Northampton, and therefore have to rely on the bus to get to Hampshire. Instead of assuming that students would seek me out in my office, I decided to try my hand at outreach by taking the bus to campus at the times they frequently did. As one student exclaimed when we had a chance encounter, “I’ve been meaning to email you and you’re just HERE when I need YOU.”

Ethnography and anthropology helped me think about technology, too. Through happenstance, I read a piece in the Chronicle of Higher Education about a book written about the culture of the free software movement. Reading this book helped me better contextualize and ground my perceptions about technology, culture, gender, and normative behaviors.

In combination with the Debates in the Digital Humanities chapter about “Why Are the Digital Humanities so White?” and a recent First Monday piece about gender imbalances in software development, it became clear to me that ideas about how to create and practice technology are still primarily male and white. This was again reinforced in another recent article about Feminist Hackerspaces “that is based on discussions and interviews conducted mostly with women and queers involved in hackerspaces and in the free/libre/open source movement in North America. Moreover, it draws from my own experience with FouFem, a feminist hackerspace in Montreal that aims at being a safer space for (self-identified) women and queers to demystify technologies, learn from peers, and create a core group of local women interested in technologies and hacking. FouFem grew from the desire to have more women and queers in the hacker/hacktivist movement in Montreal while evolving in an environment where feminist principles would be explicitly foregrounded. FouFem also stems from the desire to imagine feminist hacker projects to expand the hacker/hacktivist movement and make it even more inclusive.That entry into this world is about knowing the skills right away and practicing technology with ease rather than coming to the community with questions and learning as one goes along.”

Enter THATCamp ACRL.

I was really excited to attend a THATCamp in conjunction with a librarian conference, where I could road test ideas and programs discussed in traditional conference formats through more intimate discussions with THATCamp participants. Having attended a THATCamp in the past, I had some idea of what to expect. Moreover, my work in the digital humanities gave me confidence that I ‘belonged.’ While I am not an expert in DH, I still felt empowered to be in that makerspace. Unfortunately, other ACRL participants did not share my feelings of inclusion. Some confided in me that they did not feel comfortable. Some assumed that they needed some level of technology competencies or robust knowledge of digital humanities to properly participate. Moreover, the DH ethos of ‘hack’ over ‘yack’ can also alienate. Not everyone comes to a THATCamp ready to make, nor are all DH conversations necessarily about making; #dhpoco reinforces the necessity of ‘hacking’ about structural inequalities within DH and the academy.

I would argue that THATCamps can be valuable experience for the novice, the expert, and the full range of people in between. The experience of ‘yaking’ about digital humanities to orient a novice can introduce new sets of questions to the expert, and the intermediate can give back by engaging with the novice. For me, THATCamps allow us to grow together, build a community together, and part of that is creating spaces for multiple points of entry to include both the novice and the expert.

I owe a lot to THATCamp. In 2010, I applied to THATCamp New England on a whim and a hope that I could become part of digital humanities, and the experience of attending with a Bootcamp fellowship completely altered the way I think about my work as a librarian. With limited skills and endless desire to learn about ‘doing technology,’ I really grew after my experience there and now I am proud to say that ‘instructional technology’ is part of my new job title. I co-taught a digital humanities course at Hampshire this semester and am active in dh + lib,. I was excited to be able to give back at THATCamp ACRL by facilitating a ‘DH 101′ session. THATCamp gave me inspiration, tools, and human capital to begin working in DH. And I am so grateful for that. My experience in 2010 paved the way for me to work on digital liberal arts at some of the most exciting college campuses in the United States with some extraordinary people.

And I know that I can still grow, give back, and help figure out how digital liberal arts, digital humanities, and the humanities large will evolve. I want that process to be inclusive to many voices, not just the usual suspects, the talking heads, or the early adopters, but the skeptics, the critics, the people just finding their voices, and the librarians asking new questions and learning new skills. DH, libraries, the humanities, and higher education will all benefit from a more perfect union of participants.

What’s in a Name? DH vs. DLA

Since February, I’ve been wrestling with William Pannapacker’s Chronicle piece about digital humanities, in which he suggests we should call it digital liberal arts.

On the one hand, I am all for inclusivity: if we want to thoughtfully integrate technology and digital projects into liberal arts classrooms, we need to think across disciplines, between disciplines: all over the curriculum. On smaller campuses, with smaller staffs, it makes sense for all teaching librarians/instructional technologists to be fluent in the digital.

On the other hand, digital humanities is a THING, a discipline, a frame of reference. For students who want to move onto graduate school, understanding this THING, this discipline becomes more important to participate in the conversations underway at centers like CHNM and Scholars’ Lab. Digital humanities as a THING has particular grant opportunities; it’s a discipline in its own right. It is also has a history we can trace back to the 1980s and to humanities computing; this history, this heritage impacts how conversations happen, who gets included in these conversations, and shapes important debates like #transformdh to trace back structural decisions that impact what has been digitized, what gets recognized, and how the current debates get framed. That context, that backstory is equally value, and extremely important. As a [recovering] historian, this backstory matters; to understand where we are, we need to know where we’ve been.

I work at a liberal arts college. I graduated from a liberal arts college. I need a button that reads ‘I <3 liberal arts colleges’; they are high touch educational experiences for the lucky students who attend them. In our current age of pronounced market segmentation within higher education, it’s important to realize that the context in which we practice librarianship is important and impacts what’s possible, what we can do, and what we should do. Many liberal arts colleges represent the best of higher education; small, interactive classes, summer research opportunities, diverse student bodies, generous financial aid, and dynamic communities. And given the particular organizational strengths and values that liberal arts colleges possess that Pannpacker points to in the piece, "…DH is not a "disruption"—it is an enhancement of the core methods of an ideal liberal-arts education."

I agree that liberal arts colleges need not create smaller, ‘scaled-down’ versions of a digital humanities centers found at places like UCLA; liberal arts colleges have an opportunity to build on their successful educational experiences of small classes and close collaborations with faculty to produce original research. Keep doing more of that, I say, just in the digital context.

Liberal arts colleges struggle to find ways to sustainably support these digital initiatives, but I am confident that we will forge new paths leveraging collaborations with faculty, technologists, and librarians While pushing scholarship towards the digital, I also hope that these collaborative teams can consider the history and the context what makes these ventures so exciting, and participate in the conversations that are happening in the digital humanities at research institutions to broaden the field/discipline’s horizons towards the next phase after ‘digital humanities,’ just as practicionters pushed humanities computing into new realms. Who knows what how ‘dh’ as we know it will be identified in five, ten years, but I do think ‘digital liberal arts’ can and will inform the path towards the next horizon.

Either way, in my practice, I will toggle between ‘dh’ and ‘dla’ with equal enthusiasm and care, as the terms of digital scholarship change and evolve into the next big thing.

Faculty-Librarian Collaborations (& Friendship)

I met one of my most trusted professional collaborators and dear friends at an orchestra camp when I was 16 years old. I hated high school and was generally dour, a surprise to those who know me post-college. Trying to make sense of my identity in a community that was not accepting of difference didn’t give me much to smile or laugh about. Playing classical music was my outlet and I met wonderful, supportive friends through that venture. But no one made me laugh quite like Carla Martin did between rehearsals in the middle of Maine in 1998.

We lost touch when we went to college, but thanks to a Mark Zuckerberg production called Facebook, we reconnected when we were both working in Cambridge in 2008. We talked a lot about teaching and higher education since we were both in graduate school, me in library school, Carla in a ph.d program at Harvard. As our responsibilities shifted towards classroom work, we both noticed on Twitter that we were experimenting at the intersection of humanities, social science, and technology. We started talking more about what works in classrooms and what doesn’t, what types of tools are available and how to recast products in an academic context. Talking about our work in the context of the digital humanities community has only put the uniqueness of our relationship into focus.

Last week, we presented a flipped session about faculty-librarian collaboration at Digital Humanities: The Next Generation. As Lindsay Whitacre noted in her presentation on Saturday, “DH is not just a new set of tools and methods, it’s a new set of relationships.” I and many others have said before that Digital Humanities is a team sport, a collaborative venture that cannot be sustained by lone wolves or solitary geniuses. Digital Humanists must be as serious about building and sustaining relationships as they are about building tools.

Flipped Sessions are Fun.

Flipped sessions are fun.

My relationship with Carla is one of those important ones. I am a better librarian for knowing her, for listening to her talk about the logistics of scaling up digital projects to larger classes, for asking questions about how to support first generation students with skillfully crafted assignments and syllabi, and for helping me better understand how librarians can support junior faculty with their institutional knowledge. She’s forthcoming with examples of assignments that work, for thinking about new ways of marketing courses, and for hands-on activities in classes that I can talk about in my local community. We don’t work for the same institution, so our conversations are casual collaborations, but we can practice communication strategies we can bring home and use in our local contexts.

Our presentation dealt with miscommunications between librarians and faculty. It’s an elephant in the room when we talk about how to thoughtfully incorporate technology into classrooms. Some faculty may have an expectation that librarians and technologists passively will enact whatever they want. Other librarians may have a fear that faculty don’t value them professionally. Some faculty may feel like librarians can be passive aggressive with them when talking about workloads. Other faculty may feel like librarians can be dismissive of their technology skills. Bad communication patterns are also reinforced by higher education hierarchies that put faculty at the top and librarians towards the bottom. In my experience, librarians and faculty have excellent, complementary skills that when put in service of students, learning and research can be a powerful force for good. Librarians are masters of process; the research process, increasingly in many cases, how to manage technology projects or experimenting with technology in their practice. Faculty are masters of the content, experts in their field. I read a quote on the Feral Librarian’s blog this week from Deborah Jakubs:

“…librarians are learned and talented and bring skills and attitudes and services to the university that most regular faculty both admire and need. So rather than constantly trying to compare ourselves to faculty, and often coming up short, let’s celebrate the differences and complementarity.”

Why not leverage these complementary skill sets to build a relationship to enable digital humanities, whether it be in a research or classroom setting?

In addition to providing tangible benefits to our students and to our faculty, I think individual faculty and librarians themselves can benefit from working in teams and from participating in engaged professional relationships. Beyond doing my job better, my relationship with Carla and other faculty members enrich my life and work generally, especially since we still laugh as hard together as we did in 1998.

#5CDH: Walls, Shawls, iPads, Maps & DH

  1. @oleblanc follow #5cdh & @caropinto for live tweets from the “Of Roman Walls” DH Event at Amherst 3/1 ow.ly/hMUhf
  2. A panel featuring Karen Remmler (MHC), Jon Olson, (UM) & Caro Pinto (HC) kicked off the afternoon. 
  3. Olson is talking about ‘hacking the humanities.’ What are the humanities now? #5CDH
  4. The Europe in the 20th c. history site @jonberndtolsen and his students created digital.history.umass.edu/e… built with WordPress #5CDH
  5. Olson described how his humanities classes incorporated technology & the delicate balance between humanities & technology. Of course, this is not a question limited to just the humanities.
  6. Olson: How do we offer technology courses geared towards the humanities? This is an issue for science students too – multidisc problem #5CDH
  7. It is clear faculty cannot tackle content & technology on their own. What are the best practices?
  8. Olson musing on how to teach digital skills in the humanities. He suggests computer scientists embedded, I say, librarians. #5CDH
  9. Olson aslo mused about how mold our students into makers. Jeffrey Schapp from Harvard talks about cultivating a hybrid producer/consumer model called prosumers. 
  10. Olson: Our students are largely digital consumers & not necessarily digital producers. Glad I am trying to mold prosumers. #5CDH
  11. Caro Pinto talked about translating the value of successful and unsuccessful DH projects; how to build effective teams, and how to balance hierarchy and collaboration. 
  12. .@caropinto Librarians embedded in courses can really shape how to teach technology- how do we translate the value of what we’re doing #5CDH
  13. .@caropinto How do we translate the value of failure? Good question! So much value in something traditionally seen as ‘bad.’ #5CDH
  14.  Karen Remmler discussed feminism & DH. 
  15. Karen Remmler is now talking about the symposium she is putting together about feminism in the digital age. #5CDH
  16. Remmler: How do we decide what knowledge is valuable? #5CDH
  17. Remmler’s comments connect the the emergent #transformdh movement led by @adelinekoh & others.
  18. Karen Remmler brings up appropriateness of using the term DH, in LACs and generally. Reminds me of @pannapacker @adelinekoh & others #5CDH
  19. Remmler is talking about the digital divide, the knowledge divide. How those forces shape who is #dh. #transformdh #5CDH
  20. Remmler coming from a feminist perspective, emphasizes importance of theorizing DH & how we use it #HellYes #5CDH
  21. Remmler also talked about upcoming events & projects that explore these issues.
  22. Exciting media & digital-focused projects from the 5Colleges Women’s Studies Rsrch Ctr, which Remmler directs fivecolleges.edu/fcwsrc/pro… #5CDH
  23. The Q & A advanced a discussion of how to balance teaching content w/ teaching technology.
  24. .@caropinto Need to organize low-level classes to introduce students to tech, but higher-level courses have higher tech requirements. #5CDH
  25. And what types of assumptions we make about why our students reject e-books. 
  26. Q: How do we get students excited abt tech? Olson: This is not an eBook or an eArticle generation – students not digitally savvy #5CDH
  27. .@caropinto Barrier to using eBooks – not a format we librarians like to use – can’t pass on excitement if you’re not excited abt it. #5CDH
  28. We need to also think ab the materiality of the text, not just the content – hard copy may be important for some reading #5CDH
  29. What kinds of tools do we want to use? What kind of infrastructure do we want to build? 
  30. .@caropinto What kind of future do we want to build with technology? What do we want it to look like? #5CDH
  31. .@caropinto Educating students about economies behind digital technologies they use – what will happen to Twitter in 5 yrs? Copyright? #5CDH
  32. And then the group asked how do we preserve these projects? 
  33. .@caropinto – “we need to decide whether or not we’re keeping these projects” re: student digital work. A very real question #5CDH
  34. Then we broke for lunch. Attendees and panelists mingled as students gathered to talk about their work and experiences. 
  35. After a lunch break, we are back with a student panel. #5CDH
  36. The panel featured both graduate students & undergraduate students talking about their projects. 
  37. Students processing archival collecting while blogging. Lots of engagement from professionals around the world. #5CDH
  38. Learning abt Early Novels Database: Part digitization, part recording info. Gain access to great collx of text syslsl01.library.upenn.edu/… #5CDH
  39. Discussing the historicdress.org/omeka/ project, powered by Omeka. Different period but thought of you @nervesandveins #5CDH
  40. Looking at the Holyoke self-tour project from the Wistariahurst Museum, can be used on smartphones wistariahurst.org/walk-holy… #5CDH
  41. Students talking about the tools they used to collect data & manage research process w/ @zotero & @evernote #5CDH
  42. Students followed up on the skill building conversation that began during the panel sharing their experiences with short term certificate courses.
  43. Photoshop, Garage Band, Final Cut Pro, DreamWeaver, all skills included in an Intro to Digital Media class. Students get certificate. #5CDH
  44. Big assumption that current generation is tech literate. Not true – some learn on their own, but not a pervasive skill #5CDH
  45. Of course, this is a brave new world for students. DH includes experimentation, it brings trial & error to the humanities. 
  46. “There isn’t a template for doing any project” – necessary learning to experiment, trial & error valuable in and of itself #5CDH
  47. As well as boredom. 
  48. “A lot of the work we did was boring.” Student reflects on some of the work she contributed a #DH project. Not all #DH is sexy. #5CDH
  49. Student admits the “boring” “drudgery” of work behind sexy DH projects – how to balance this with LAC traditions of analysis? #5CDH
  50. Also, students should not be used to just absorb drudgery in #dh. But drudgery is part of building #dh. How to balance? #5CDH
  51. Project managers & faculty need to effectively communicate expectations and DH values to new participants to contextualize their labor. 
  52. There is a lot of delayed gratification in #dh. How to balance getting stuff done & vision. How to effectively communicate impact. #5CDH
  53. Student talks ab importance of prof helping them think through theoretical, academic implications of the “drudgery” work they did #5CDH
  54. Q: How do you deal with the drudgery? A: When you’re done, realize how important & worthwhile it was. Balancing b/t drudgery&fun helps #5CDH
  55. Socializing students into the #dh community as well as skill building. Ethics & community on social media.
    #5CDH
  56. But the proof is in the pudding:
  57. Student describes first uploads to Omeka as “amazing” – like “first discovering google search” #5CDH cc @patrick_mj :)
  58. Students are gratified to see their work online. Really gratified. #5CDH
  59. Important pedagogical implications RT @caropinto Students are gratified to see their work online. Really gratified. #5CDH
  60. Eric Poehler shares Pompeii Project that featured iPads, enthusiastic students & drones. 
  61. Investigating Pompeii without excavation. Digital Magic! #5CDH.
  62. Beautiful non-intrusive, digital archaeology of Pompeii from @Pompeiana79 – including cool drone camerawork #5CDH #MakeScholarshipNotWar
  63. great to watch @Pompeiana79 explain how to use iPad for #archaeology mapping when excavation too costly, intrusive #5CDH #DH #preservation
  64. Poehler’s effectively demonstrated how the technology enabled his team to do more analysis. 
  65. New tech allows archaeologists to spend less time measuring and matching, and more time to extend the interpretation of work. #5CDH
  66. Putting interpretation in the field – real value of efficiency #5CDH
  67. .@Pompeiana79: #digital technology allows us to record data in 1/10 time–which allows us 10x as much time for interpretation. #archaeology
  68. @Pompeiana79: #archaeology #mapping techniques e.g. terrestrial laser scanning, #drones (drink!), cloud-based photogrammetry, GPR #DH
  69. With wonderful offline implications:
  70. .@pompeiana79: once you learn to see time in material, you’ll never look at things the same way again #archaeology #preservation
  71. After Poehler’s talk, we closed out the day with posters & socializing. 
  72. Finishing up the day with a ‘moveable feast’ of poster sessions from current projects in Five Colleges. #5CDH

CFP: Digital Humanities for Liberal Arts Colleges

Five College Committee work is one of the highlights of my job at Hampshire College. I am lucky enough to serve on a few committees and task forces including one called DEDCC (Digital Environment Development & Coordinating Committee). One of our goals this year is to raise awareness among librarians of Digital Humanities and how librarians can get involved. To that end, this committee is organizing a program in the Five Colleges later this year. Below is the call for proposals along with a link to submit proposals, as well as some context about who we are in the Five Colleges:

The Five College Consortium is exploring a June program introducing Digital Humanities to an audience of librarians and IT staff at our institutions.  The Consortium in western Massachusetts includes Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, four liberal arts colleges and one ARL.  We are interested in identifying speakers who can discuss digital humanities vision or digital humanities work in liberal arts settings targeted at undergraduate teaching and research.  We are open to a variety of interpretations on/definitions of the phrase “digital humanities”’ and its intersection with other initiatives around teaching with technology in the undergraduate curriculum.  We envision a panel followed by breakout sessions during which we will ask our panelists to participate in small group discussion.  Possible topics for discussion include:

  • What does it mean to do work in this field in liberal arts colleges?
  • How to help faculty navigate shifting technologies
  • Mapping out new collaborative relationships (inside our institutions and across the Five Colleges)
  • Where should conversation around research/teaching/technology be happening?
  • Content mashups and the development of new kinds of “collections”
  • The library’s role in a supporting digital culture
  • What professional skill sets are needed to support digital humanities work?
  • Infrastructure/services/copyright/IP

If you have interest in participating on our panel and in small group discussion, we would like to hear from you!  Please submit a brief proposal online at http://bit.ly/dhproposals by March 8th, describing your interest in the areas outlined above and your interest in speaking to our audience.  We are looking towards mid-June for the program itself and will confirm dates with the identified speakers.  Please direct questions to:

Erin Stalberg,

Chair, Five Colleges Consortium, DEDCC; estalber@mtholyoke.edu; 413.538.2228

For further information on the Five College Consortium., please see:  https://www.fivecolleges.edu/